the Kamloops "motorcycle riding fools" south american adventure

motoged

New member
No comments yet regarding los sanitarios....paper provided, or do carry yer own?

Being in a different part of the world sure brings up some appreciations for home....as well as enjoying the local differences.

Sometimes a club sandwich is a rescue meal.....and sometimes it puts you on the john for two days :eek:

And how tall are the curbs down there? Latino countries seem to build curbs high enough to allow for 6 centuries of street paving to adjust the height differential.
 

mugs

New member
No toilet seats 50% of the time , paper is available when asked for , shower curtains sometimes , curbs huge, uneven or missing chunks of side walks , grates missing and holes everyware., dog shit and the odd person to stepover are all common everyday occurances. Getting what you order in the restuarant is 50 50 and allways a laugh when it comes because we all seem to think we didn't order that. Nothing suprises us anymore. We had a local order a tire in for mark this morning at about 9:30 , it actually got here about 10 hrs later from a town about 200 kilos away, it was michelin enduro tire which we were glad to get. Its installed on the bike and were out of here in the morning. Also bought a spare 21 " just in case.
 

motoged

New member
Damn....that tire service beats what would happen if you were in a pickle in Spuzzum or Horsefly....
Wayne, I hopefully get the bike this morning....after that, we will see how things go...:eek:

It sounds like your bikes are holding up.....and the tires , too, considering the mileage and terrain....and 5 bikes. It must be your collective skills and wisdom wringing the most out of your systems...

Walking along sidewalks at night in the dark is muy peligroso....the craters, cliffs, and over-hanging wires and signs surely add to the risks. A friend in Baja was getting out of a taxi in Cabo and sliced open his forehead on a No Parking sign.....the irony was the insult upon the injury.....9 stitches on Day One. You guys must have your routines down to a fine art by now.....packing, getting rooms, ordering meals (especially as a group in smaller places).

Is Robin your primary translator or are you guys getting a few palabras y preguntas in between? Pehaps the occasional broma???

We are loving the updates.....but writing ride reports can sometimes distract from the adventure at hand.

Que via bien, amigos.
 

jbob

New member
and I thought San Salvador had the worst exhaust in the world! Good to hear from Smitty Boy,what an adventure!! Hi from everyone and keep those pics comin'!! JB
 

homer592

New member
~~ Hello From the Northern hemisphere , Following along on the Adventure has been a Fantastic Great Ride, Thanks for the pictures and Great Stories Wayne :) Looking forward to sitting down for a night of Brews and Jabber when you boys get back onto Home Turf,~~ Enjoy, be safe and Have FUN, Passing on The "HI's" From Friends.. Pictures when Able ..haha Frustration~~ Makes us really appreciate what we take for granted as NORMAL everyday around here~ Cheers B~RaD
 

04klr

Well-known member
hey there! the day before yesterday was the hottest of the trip 42 degrees on floyds thermo. hot and dry desert just like home, in the summer of coarse, and today as we head further into patgonia the winds are increasing and for the net couple of days we expect the winds to get even stronger, Mark loves it, not! We stayed in a campground that included a free beer each with the site, which proved to be the crack in the dam as bottle after bottle toppled over after the free one was gone, and these are 950ml ones! needless to say the day had a slow start and i was barely able to fit my fattened head inside my helmet. We rode a shortish day 340k and are presently in Gobernator Costa (i think)

awhile back i posted a pic. of a family of four on bike at a gas station, well that would be the bike in station wagon mode, there is another mode you see lots of, truck mode, and in this case the truck is moving two people and a rather large ladder, no problem.
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and just as easy is two riders, a large industrial weedeater and enuf gas for a week.

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and when you need a trailer, get out the saw and cut the fork out of a couple of trees, nail-em together and you're good to go, just keep it away from open flames.

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how about some people pictures, the first is one of one of the very many "Yoda's" we saw in Peru and in the case of this one in Bolivia, there sitting on the side of the road at around 15000ft staring off into the void, perhaps spinning wool, but just sitting there? perhaps watching over some goats/sheep/a cow. We would see lone people sitting on the side of the road all over the place. having lunch at over 12000ft
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I asked this woman if it was ok to take her picture, before she said no I had taken it, oops sorry bout that.

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this old boy looked waay too comfortable so i looped around and took this shot, looks like he's been laying there for eons and the ground has settled in around him.
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each town it seems has it's own shtick, and in this town it's these huge hats, all adults wear them and most kids, sometimes until you see their face you can't tell the difference between kids or the very elderly as they all dress the same.

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taking their cows for a walk.
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this is my favorite pic. she covered her face and was giggling like crazy, i didn't see that she covered up until after i took the shot. I offered the two canadian flag lapel pins which they refused to accept, not sure why.
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while it may look like these two are packing a heavy load, they are not, i would say that it is about an average sized load compared to the many people we see lugging stuff around.

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all for now, as we are off to gas the bikes up, and to get food which is always an adventure.

next post will bring the Andes into view, and reveal the source of my WOW! of a couple of weeks ago.
l8tr Wayne and the boys.
 
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04klr

Well-known member
to start things off here's a pic for DSBC member "tiwelder", safety first on this welder being used in Peru.

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in doing a trip like this there are many sights to see along the way, places that you may want to take in Macchu Picchu, old ruins, historical locations and the mountains, for me what i wanted to do/see was the Andes with a desire to cross them as many times as possible and we've done a pretty good job of it. Our first foray into the hills was hwy 10 in Columbia and we were awed, but that was before the Andes really began, and as steep scenic as hwy was 10 completely paled to the big ones, our first yahoos! at reaching 12000ft were to e eclipsed by reaching 16000! Cameras cant do it justice, and the near vertical slopes dont look as steep s they truly are, the andes are far behind us now and travelling over them was fantastic.

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my gps was a couple of hundred feet low at this point, i recalibrated it later.

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yes that's the road

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this slope was basically just layers of road each with two switchbacks and just stacked up parallel to each other, for many thousands of vertical feet

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passing theu a split in the rocks at the apex of the road at just over 16000 ft.

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a different road section down in a valley bottom where we camped beside the river, which is still at approx. 12 thousand feet!

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you dont have near enuf fingers and toes to count the switchbacks on these roads.

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here's another twisted section in peru

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while we rode over many roads in peru that have names that are not well known and passed thru remote villages that clearly rarely if ever see the likes of us, there are other roads that have infamous well known names like the "camino de la muerte" in bolivia, the road of death! as dangerous as the road is, and the potential for your day going permanently wrong, it really was anticlimactic compared to there we went in Peru.
here's Mark along one of the skinnier sections

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plenty of room to pass

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straight up, way down.

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and you can relax on those foggy sections along the near vertical cliffs, as they have this rickety old wooden railing to save you from certain, death.

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and as i am running out of space this last pic. is to put proof in the pudding as to how steep the hills really are.

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until next time Wayne.
 
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cactusreid

Active member
I bet those loaded klr's just yank themselves out from under you, when you grab a big handful of throttle at 16k feet? but hey, it looks like you guy's chose the right bike as your all still mobile, with what seems like very little issues. ride safe boy's, and enjoy the rest of your journey! If you hurry, you maybe able to catch a bit of snow when you get back!
 

motoged

New member
Wayne,
Primo update.....fog, rain, 200 mile high roadside cliffs....and camping by a mountain raging river.....just ticked off an item on the bucket list....your pics bring it to life..


Love the hats....
 

Randual

Member
Fantastic photos and ride report... I've been following this since the beginning and my hats off to you guys on this True Adventure!
I look forward to seeing you at the Loose Screw and hearing some stories over a few cold ones !!!
Randy
 

Zuki

New member
Well if the pics don't do it justice on the type of terrain...it's gotta be too much for words even! Those roads are intense! It is such a wonder on who made them all and the purpose? Was it just for the adventure of being up there? So very cool these pics. You guys are going to be so bored on any other bike rides from now on!
 

wrstu

Member
I bet the Billy Goat "aka Mark" wished he had his 530 along for the swithback sections, only to see if he could find a "shortcut", and make things more interesting that they already were!
 

Ann Vandrick

New member
OMG - what BREATHTAKING photos! How generous of you to share your rides in rarified air with us mere mortals. Talked to Al the other day. He sounded good - sick as a dog mind you - but good. I think someone else made the very astute observation about how difficult it will be to do ANYTHING normal after this remarkable adventure. So will you be collaborating on the book or writing 4 separate editions? Put me on the buying list.
;)
 

Bora20

Administrator
I cant' wait to sit in a room with all the boys when you get home and watch the slideshow on the big screen.
 

Rooster

New member
It's hard to believe how time flies and all the experiences you are going through ( seems like you just left ) but I am dreaming about it and you guys have inspired me to start looking into doing the same trip! I've got a couple friends who sound interested already! Ride safe my friends and we will be looking forward to beers and stories eh!
 
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